Crowns and Bridges Post Op

Online Dental Education Library

Our patient education section is designed to enable you to learn more about dentistry and oral health related topics. The more we educate each patient, the more informed everyone is about their dental health.

If there is a topic you want to learn more about that you don't find on our website, please let us know.

You will find information ranging from what causes bad breath to how to read x-rays to oral cancer.

Please either click the blue arrow pointing to the right at the bottom of the page or click any of the links below to go directly to that page.

Refrain from eating for at least 2 hours and/or until the anesthesia has worn off.

Temporary:

A temporary is a crown or bridge that is placed on the prepared teeth while the final restoration is being made. The temporary serves a very important purpose. It protects the exposed dentin so it is not overly sensitive, prevents food and bacteria from collecting on the prepared teeth, and prevents the tooth from shifting or moving, which can make seating of the final restoration more difficult.

The temporary is placed with lightweight cement that is designed to come off easily. Avoid chewing sticky foods such as gum, caramels, etc.

Use your toothbrush to clean the temporary as you normally do your natural teeth. However, when flossing, it is best to pull the floss through the contact rather than lift up on the temporary so you don't accidentally loosen it. If your temporary comes off between appointments, slip it back on and call our office so that we can re-cement it for you. A little denture adhesive placed inside the crown can help to hold it in place in the interim.

Sensitivity:

Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common briefly following treatment. For the first few days, avoid extremely hot or cold foods and beverages. It is normal to have discomfort in the gums around the tooth after the anesthesia wears off.

If your gums are tender, rinse with warm salt water, dissolving 1/2 teaspoon of salt in an 8 oz. glass of warm water. An analgesic such as Tylenol or Advil will help to decrease your discomfort.

Final Crown or Bridge:

After the final cementation of your restoration, it may take a few days for you to get used to the new crown or bridge. If your bite feels unbalanced, please be sure to call our office for an appointment for a simple adjustment.

Home Care:

Although crowns and bridges are often the most durable of all restorations, the underlying tooth is still vulnerable to decay, especially at the interface between the tooth and crown. It is important to resume regular brushing and flossing immediately. Daily home care and regulating your intake of sugar-containing foods will increase the longevity of your new restorations.